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Expert Guest Lecturers

Expert Lecturers on Thalassa Educational Journeys

 

Richard A. Billows

Richard A. Billows

Prof. Richard A. Billows is Professor of History and Director of Classical Studies Graduate Program at Columbia University.  He specializes in Ancient Greek and Roman History and Greek epigraphy and is the author of several books, including Marathon: The Battle That Changed Western Civilization  and Kings and Colonists: Aspects of Macedonian Imperialism.  Prof. Billows received his BA from Oxford University and his PhD from the University of California at Berkeley.

Maria Panagiotopoulou

Maria Panagiotopoulou

Maria Panagiotopoulou, is an award winning ornithologist and forester.  The holder of a M. Sc. in Management of Protected Areas from the Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki, and a M. Sc. in Evolutionary Ecology from Sweden’s Lund University, Ms. Panagiotopoulou has conducted research in the wetlands we will visit, and participated in numerous projects and studies in the protection of the wetlands and their biodiversity. Ms. Panagiotopoulou has  published extensively in learned publications.

Eleftheria Manta

Eleftheria Manta

Eleftheria Manta was born in Thessaloniki, Greece.  She is Associate Professor of Modern Greek History at the School of History and Archaeology.  She studied History at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki where she received her Master degree after conducting a 1-year research program in Rome with a scholarship of the Rotary Club of Thessaloniki.  She received her Ph.D. (2005) on Modern and Contemporary History while she was working as Research Associate of the Institute for Balkan Studies, in Thessaloniki.  In 2008, she was elected Director of that same Institute.  She joined the School of History and Archaeology of the Aristotle University in 2011, initially as Lecturer.  Her academic and research interests include Modern Greek history (from 17th c.), Albanian and Balkan history, Greek-Albanian relations etc. She speaks English, French, Italian, and Albanian.  Her main publications  are: Poverty and Charity in Thessaloniki (1930-1935), Thessaloniki 2016 (in cooperation with D. Kontogeorgis and Ch. Mandatzis); The Educational System for the Greek Minority in Albania during the Interwar Period, Thessaloniki 2010); Muslim Albanians in Greece. The Chams of Epirus (1923-2000), Thessaloniki 2000 (originally in Greek, translated in English, 2008, and in Albanian, 2015);
Kosovo and the Albanian Populations in the Balkans, Thessaloniki 2000 (collective work); The Greek Minority in Albania. A Documentary Record (1921-1993), Thessaloniki 1994 (in cooperation with B. Kondis).

Claire Fontijn

Claire Fontijn

Claire Fontijn is Phyllis Henderson Carey Professor of Music at Wellesley College, MA, where she teaches courses on Early Music; the Symphony; Music, Gender, and Sexuality; and Music in Public Discourse.  She is the author of three books: a monograph, Desperate Measures: the Life and Music of Antonia Padoani Bembo (2006; 2013); a set of essays, Fiori Musicali: Liber Amicorum Alexander Silbiger (2010), and another monograph, The Vision of Music of Saint Hildegard’s Scivias—Synthesizing Image, Text, Notation, and Theory (2013).  Early in her career, she was an award-winning semi-professional baroque flutist; currently, she plays the renaissance alto flute with the Wellesley College Collegium Musicum.  She is an avid Europhile who has lived and worked in France, the Netherlands, and Italy.

 

Jeremy McInerney

Jeremy McInerney

Jeremy McInerney is Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Pennsylvania, and chair of the Graduate Group in Ancient History. He completed his PhD in 1992 at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of The Folds of Parnassos, a book on state formation in Archaic Greece and The Cattle of the Sun, a book dealing with the importance of cattle-raising, meat and sacrifice in the culture of Ancient Greece. He is editor of Blackwell’s Companion to Ethnicity in the Ancient Mediterranean and co-editor of Landscapes of Value: Natural Environment and Cultural Imagination in Classical Antiquity, published in 2016. In January 2018, Thames and Hudson published his new volume, Ancient Greece: A New History. He has published more than thirty articles on topics ranging from gender to epigraphy. Currently he is working on the function of hybridity in Greek culture, and is also completing a study of Athenians relations with the island of Lemnos as part of which he reexamines the temple of Hephaistos at Athens. He serves on the Managing Committee of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, where he was Whitehead Professor in 2013-14. At the University of Pennsylvania he has won the Ira Abrams teaching award from the School of Arts and Sciences and the Lindback award from the University.

John H. Oakley

John H. Oakley

John H. Oakley is the Chancellor Professor and Forrest D. Murden Jr Professor at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Educated at Rutgers University (BS, MA, and PhD), he is a Classical Archaeologist whose main research interests are Greek vases and Roman sarcophagi. Greece is a second home to him, and his time living there includes a three-year stint as the Mellon Professor of Classical Studies at the American School of Classical Studies.  He has also taught as an invited scholar in New Zealand, Freiburg (Germany), Brussels, and lectured widely. Among his many books are The Wedding in Ancient AthensPicturing Death in Classical Athens, and The Greek Vase – the Art of the Storyteller.

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