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Expert Guest Lecturers

Expert Lecturers on Thalassa Educational Journeys

 

Maria Panagiotopoulou

Maria Panagiotopoulou

Maria Panagiotopoulou, is an award winning ornithologist and forester.  The holder of a M. Sc. in Management of Protected Areas from the Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki, and a M. Sc. in Evolutionary Ecology from Sweden’s Lund University, Ms. Panagiotopoulou has conducted research in the wetlands we will visit, and participated in numerous projects and studies in the protection of the wetlands and their biodiversity. Ms. Panagiotopoulou has  published extensively in learned publications.

Richard A. Billows

Richard A. Billows

Prof. Richard A. Billows is Professor of History and Director of Classical Studies Graduate Program at Columbia University.  He specializes in Ancient Greek and Roman History and Greek epigraphy and is the author of several books, including Marathon: The Battle That Changed Western Civilization  and Kings and Colonists: Aspects of Macedonian Imperialism.  Prof. Billows received his BA from Oxford University and his PhD from the University of California at Berkeley.

Panayoti Kelaidis

Panayoti Kelaidis

Panayoti Kelaidis, is a plant explorer, gardener and public garden administrator associated with Denver Botanic Gardens where he is Senior Curator and Director of Outreach.  He has introduced hundreds of native ornamentals from throughout the Western United States to general horticulture.  His travels have taken him throughout the world, including much of Europe from Spain to Turkey.  He has lectured in over 140 cities in twelve countries, and has published widely in horticultural journals. He speaks Greek and has a broad interest in the culture, history and botany of Greece.

Bert Harrill

Bert Harrill

Bert Harrill, a biblical scholar and Professor of History and Classics at The Ohio State University, received his B.A. with highest honors in religious studies from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in New Testament and early Christian literature from the University of Chicago.  For over 25 years he has taught undergraduate courses and graduate seminars on the apostle Paul, in the different contexts of history, religious studies, theology, and divinity school faculties. Professor Harrill’s research profile in Pauline studies specializes on Greco-Roman social and family history.  His books include Paul the Apostle: His Life and Legacy in Their Roman Context (Cambridge University Press, 2012), Slaves in the New Testament: Literary, Social, and Moral Dimensions (Fortress Press, 2006), and The Manumission of Slaves in Early Christianity (Mohr Siebeck, 1995).  He has served on the editorial boards of New Testament Studies, Journal of Biblical Literature, and the Anchor Yale Bible Commentary and Reference Library, a monograph series from Yale University Press. His teaching has received numerous awards, including ones from Ohio State University and Indiana University, Bloomington.

Alan Shapiro

Alan Shapiro

H. A. Shapiro is the W. H. Collins Vickers Professor of Archaeology, Emeritus, in the Department of Classics at Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of several books on Greek archaeology, myth, and religion, including Art and Cult under the Tyrants in Athens (1989), Personifications in Greek Art (1993), Myth into Art: Poet and Painter in Classical Greece (1994), and Re-fashioning Anakreon in Classical Athens (2012). He has also curated exhibitions of Greek art at the New Orleans Museum of Art (Greek Vases from Southern Collections, 1981) and the Onassis Cultural Center in New York (Worshipping Women: Ritual and Reality in Classical Athens, 2008).

Jerolyn E. Morrison

Jerolyn E. Morrison

Dr. Jerolyn E. Morrison is an anthropologist/archaeologist and potter who uses these disciplines to teach people about ancient Greek culture.

In 1997, Jerolyn traveled to Crete to learn how to collect and process raw clay to make pots with her mentor Jennifer Moody, who was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship for her archaeological and environmental work in Crete.  Every year since, Jerolyn has returned to Greece to work on archaeological projects, until 2006 when she moved to Crete from the United States.  In 2007, Jerolyn was awarded a Fulbright grant to explore ancient Greece cooking.  The experiential program she developed, called “Minoan Tastes”, creates a living-type museum for culinary experiences by cooking in similar types of Minoan cooking pots and using the food ingredients that were available during the Bronze Age.

In conjunction with her passion, Jerolyn has been researching in Greece as a Bronze Age ceramic expert and a member of the publication staff for the Mochlos and Papadiokambos excavations in Crete and the island of Kos.  Beyond Greek culture, Jerolyn has worked with local people in Scandinavia, Central and South America, and in Anatolia to learn about craft production and home cooking.  These experiences have contributed to a more well-rounded world view of how people in the past and today live.

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